An ever-growing wonder.

space (lots of alien shit), game of thrones, lotr, grainy personals, old stuff, tim and eric, animals, stuff i find funny, weed things, history, movies, music, guns, survivalism, random cool facts/stuff/people, nature, trailer park boys. still learning a lot about life and it's lessons @ 25 years old. someone help me

(Source: nutstradamus, via thebadwolfrises)

minutemanworld:

One of the compasses used on the Lewis & Clark expedition. Meriwether Lewis was born on August 19th, 1774. This compass is in the National Museum of American History.
In the spring of 1803, Meriwether Lewis began to purchase scientific and mathematical instruments for a pending expedition into the northwestern region of North America. Among the items he purchased from Philadelphia instrument maker Thomas Whitney were three pocket compasses for $2.50 each, and this silver-plated pocket compass for $5. It has a mahogany box, a silver-plated brass rim that is graduated to degrees and numbered in quadrants from north and south, a paper dial, two small brass sight vanes, and a leather carrying case. Whether Lewis purchased the silver compass for himself or intended it as a special gesture for William Clark is not known.Following the instructions of President Thomas Jefferson, the Corps of Discovery, under the leadership of Lewis and Clark, ascended the Missouri River in May 1804 to obtain detailed information on the natural resources of the region, to search for a northwest passage, and to make official diplomatic contact with Indian leaders.
By the time they returned to St. Louis in September 1806, few of the instruments that were purchased for the trip had survived the journey. The pocket compass, however, was kept by Clark as a memento. He later gave the compass to his friend, Capt. Robert A. McCabe, whose heirs donated it in 1933 to the Smithsonian Institution.

minutemanworld:

One of the compasses used on the Lewis & Clark expedition. Meriwether Lewis was born on August 19th, 1774. This compass is in the National Museum of American History.

In the spring of 1803, Meriwether Lewis began to purchase scientific and mathematical instruments for a pending expedition into the northwestern region of North America. Among the items he purchased from Philadelphia instrument maker Thomas Whitney were three pocket compasses for $2.50 each, and this silver-plated pocket compass for $5. It has a mahogany box, a silver-plated brass rim that is graduated to degrees and numbered in quadrants from north and south, a paper dial, two small brass sight vanes, and a leather carrying case. Whether Lewis purchased the silver compass for himself or intended it as a special gesture for William Clark is not known.Following the instructions of President Thomas Jefferson, the Corps of Discovery, under the leadership of Lewis and Clark, ascended the Missouri River in May 1804 to obtain detailed information on the natural resources of the region, to search for a northwest passage, and to make official diplomatic contact with Indian leaders.

By the time they returned to St. Louis in September 1806, few of the instruments that were purchased for the trip had survived the journey. The pocket compass, however, was kept by Clark as a memento. He later gave the compass to his friend, Capt. Robert A. McCabe, whose heirs donated it in 1933 to the Smithsonian Institution.

(Source: americanhistory.si.edu)

brudesworld:

Dan Adkins, 1968

brudesworld:

Dan Adkins, 1968

(via 70sscifiart)

chrestomatheia:

Joseph-Paul Blanc, Ruggiero rescuing Angelica, 1876.

chrestomatheia:

Joseph-Paul Blanc, Ruggiero rescuing Angelica, 1876.

(via mererecorder)

ellakaylis:

jt-the-accuser:

Favorite horror movies/ You’re Next (2011)

This movie was awesome

dissonantwalrus:

holy fuck

The Falling Astronauts // Davis Meltzer
vintascope:

Misc Victorian Cards & Scrap 041

vintascope:

Misc Victorian Cards & Scrap 041

rickyisms: “sasparilla”

(via trailerparklegends)

(Source: chelseawoosh, via bonerrrrr)

336bc:

louvre.fr:

Helmet of a Thracian Gladiator

Troisième quart du Ier siècle ap. J.-C. Found in the gladiators’ barracks at Pompei, Campagna, southern Italy Campagna, southern Italy

This bronze helmet, richly decorated with a Gorgon’s and a griffin’s head, was probably used by Thracian gladiators during the parades preceding the games in the amphitheater at Pompeii, just before Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD. The shape of the visor, which evolved over the course of the first century, is typical of the period. The eye openings have been replaced by a grill covering the upper part of the face, and plume holders have been added on either side of the helmet.

Armor discovered at Pompeii

This bronze helmet is one of a number of pieces of armor given in 1802 to the First Consul Bonaparte by Ferdinand IV, king of Naples. They were buried when Vesuvius erupted and the region of Naples was laid waste on 24 August, AD 79, but saw the light of day when excavations were carried out (1766-67) in the gladiators’ barracks at Pompeii. They were kept at Malmaison until the death of Josephine and thereafter entered the Durand collection (1814) and the Comte de Pourtalès collection (1825), before being purchased by the Musées Impériaux in 1865. Finally, they were transferred to the Louvre from the Musée des Antiquités Nationales at Saint-Germain-en-Laye in 1892. The armor, which is richly embossed, was probably used in the parades that preceded the games in the arena.

(Source: 990000, via peashooter85)

discardingimages:

butt trumpeting horse(above: ‘Gloria Patri’ - ‘Glory be to the Father’)‘The Maastricht Hours’, Liège 14th century.
British Library, Stowe 17, fol. 153v

discardingimages:

butt trumpeting horse
(above: ‘Gloria Patri’ - ‘Glory be to the Father’)

‘The Maastricht Hours’, Liège 14th century.

British Library, Stowe 17, fol. 153v

(via medieval)

Suuuch a solid show